Deep Sky

M42 The Orion Nebula
M42 The Orion Nebula

I've now added RGB colour to the narrowband image. The hydrogen-alpha data was blended into the Red data and also used as a luminance layer.

M42- The Orion Nebula in Hα
M42- The Orion Nebula in Hα

This mono image of probably the most famous nebula in the night sky was imaged through a hydrogen-alpha filter. This technique captures the huge clouds of glowing hydrogen gas, in which new stars are being born. 4 x 10 minute exposures 20 x 3 minute exposures 30 x 1 minute exposures Total 2 hours 10 mins. This will be the first part of a narrowband image of M42 Altair Astro 115mm Triplet Atik 428Ex mono camera and Baader filters OAG and QHY5L-II EQ8

Finished NGC 6888
Finished NGC 6888

Here's my finalised version of this nebula (is any image ever truly finished???). I've added in some short R,G,B data that I collected to capture some star colour. This data was then layered in to correct the narrowband star bloat. You can see the results in the beautiful golden stars in the top right-hand corner. I think that I'll leave this nebula alone for now as I am very pleased with the results.

NGC6888 The Crescent Nebula
NGC6888 The Crescent Nebula

This is a bi-colour image, using narrowband Hydrogen-alpha data as the Red channel and the OxygenIII data as Green. A false Blue channel has been created by blending the H-a and OIII data together. The outer shell of ionised Oxygen forms the blue outer envelope. There's just over 9 hours total exposure in this image.

NGC6888 The Crescent Nebula
NGC6888 The Crescent Nebula

Another version of this nebula, this time with the H-a data as Red, OIII as Blue and a false Green layer created using the Steve Cannistra tone-mapping workflow.

NGC6888 The Crescent Nebula in H-a
NGC6888 The Crescent Nebula in H-a

11 x 20 minute exposures in 7Nm hydrogen-alpha. This is a Work-in-Progress- I'll add in colour once the dark nights return in the Autumn. The Crescent Nebula is an emission nebula in the constellation Cygnus, about 5000 light-years away. It was discovered by Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel in 1792. It is formed by the fast stellar wind from the Wolf-Rayet star WR136 colliding with and energizing the slower moving wind ejected by the star when it became a red giant around 250,000 to 400,000 years ago.

NGC6888 The Crescent Nebula in H-a
NGC6888 The Crescent Nebula in H-a

11 x 20 minute exposures in 7Nm hydrogen-alpha. This is a Work-in-Progress. I've added a false colour to show up the light that's being emitted by the ionised Hydrogen-alpha molecules

Compositing Hydrogen-alpha
Compositing Hydrogen-alpha

This shows the effect of compositing Hydrogen-alpha data into a RGB image. The H-a data was captured using a Baader 7Nm filter. This data was then blended into the Red channel. Clouds of ionized hydrogen in Andromeda are regions of active star formation, in effect, star nurseries.

Heart of the Heart nebula (IC1805)
Heart of the Heart nebula (IC1805)

2 hours of 10 minute exposures in hydrogen-alpha. The Heart Nebula, IC 1805, Sh2-190, lies some 7500 light years away from Earth and is located in the Perseus Arm of the Galaxy in the constellation Cassiopeia. This is an emission nebula showing glowing gas and darker dust lanes. The nebula is formed by plasma of ionized hydrogen and free electrons. The very brightest part of this nebula is separately classified as NGC 896, because it was the first part of this nebula to be discovered.

Nebulosity in the Pleiades
Nebulosity in the Pleiades

A cluster of hot, young, blue stars formed some 100 million years ago.

Galaxy UGC02838
Galaxy UGC02838

Galaxy UGC02838 is a very faint galaxy at a distance of 315 million lights years from us. This means that the photons that have formed this image left their stars before the dinosaurs evolved on Earth.

M27 in Hydrogen Alpha
M27 in Hydrogen Alpha

M27, The Dumbbell Nebula, captured in hydrogen-alpha.

M81 and M82 Wide-field
M81 and M82 Wide-field

This is a stack of 12 x 500 sec RBG exposures with 6 x 600 sec Hydrogen-alpha giving 2.65 hours total exposure. The hydrogen-alpha data has been blended into the Red channel. The same data is also blended into the Luminance channel creating a Ha-HaRRGB image. The RGB data was captured using an Equinox 80, TRF-2008 and QHY8L. The H-a data was captured with the same scope, an Atik 428mono and Baader 7m hydrogen-alpha filter.

M27 The Dumbbell Nebula.jpg
M27 The Dumbbell Nebula.jpg

The Dumbbell Nebula (also known as Apple Core Nebula, Messier 27, M 27, or NGC 6853) is a planetary nebula in the constellation Vulpecula, at a distance of about 1,360 light years.At its brightness of visual magnitude 7.5 and its diameter of about 8 arcminutes. 12 x 300 sec Lums 12 x 150 sec Blue BIN 2x2. 12 x 150 Red BIN 2x2 Clouds prevented me from capturing the green channel, so I synthesised the green data from the red and blue in Photoshop

M42 and the Running Man Nebula
M42 and the Running Man Nebula

Stack of 14 200 second exposures, stacked in Deep Sky Stacker, processed in Photoshop. QHY8L OSC camera on Equinox 80mm refractor on NEQ6 mount.

M31 The Andromeda Galaxy
M31 The Andromeda Galaxy

M31 with 6 hours total exposure 20 individual sub-exposures, each 6 minutes long The Andromeda Galaxy is a spiral galaxy approximately 2.5 million light-years rom Earth in the Andromeda constellation. The Andromeda Galaxy is the nearest spiral galaxy to our Milky Way galaxy, but not the closest galaxy overall. It gets its name from the area of the sky in which it appears, the constellation of Andromeda, which was named after the mythological princess Andromeda.

M45- The Pleaides
M45- The Pleaides

Also known as the Seven Sisters. This bright cluster of hot, blue young stars is one of the most recognisable objects in the night sky. It is a cluster of young stars that formed about 100 million years ago and is currently moving through an unrelated cloud of dust. Equipment Used: Canon 50D on Equinox 80 Pro. Mounted on EQ6, unguided. 19 x 150 second exposures. Stacked in DSS, processed in PS5

M13
M13

The Great Globular Cluster in Hercules. This is a cluster of about 300,000 stars, located in the constellation of Hercules. The cluster is about 145 light years across and lies 25,000 light years from us. Equipment Used: Canon 50D on Equinox Pro. Mounted on EQ6, guided by QHY5 + finderguider and PHD 22 x 200s subs 10 x 200s darks 25 x flats

M13
M13

Another view of the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules. A slightly tighter crop, with enhanced star colour.